Counting Task Cards with Halloween Racers for grades K - 2

by Learning Harbor™ Resources for Teachers
for Grade K - 2

                             
                           Counting Task Cards Halloween Racers K - 2


Follow little Halloween racing characters as they help teach elementary kids how to count forward from a given number that is not the number 1. This task stumps children in kindergarten, grade 1 and 2. Tie your math lesson to Halloween and brighten your students’ day, as well as their interest in your lesson.

Kids get to see funny little Frankenstein’s monsters and happy little Dracula vampires, as well as adorable witches and baseball cap-wearing mummies drive cute race cars toward the finish line. The purple and orange colors heighten kids’ engagement when trying to pick the correct card. Students see a set of cards with multiple numbers. They’re given a card with a problem, such as a 5 and a 7. Students must then figure out how to choose the number that is the right number between the two. What number comes after 5? Don’t worry; it’s not as scary as it sounds, you can assure your students. These cards take the ‘fright’ out of the fest and put the ‘happy’ back into Halloween.

This kind of complex counting is foundational to having kids learn advanced addition strategies in later elementary grades. The more students learn to count from 1 to 50 without having to start at one, the better off their conceptualization of math will be. In his Developmental Psychology article, Cognitive Predictors of Achievement Growth in Mathematics: a 5-year Longitudinal Study, David Geary, from the University of Missouri, Columbia, deduces that counting skills appear most important to arithmetic skill acquisition through 5th grade and therefore may be a better predictor of future math success than other skills, such as speed and memory. These cards help a student to work towards greater proficiency with regard to hierarchical inclusion as well as number sequencing. Students eventually learn, with the help of these cards, that each number represents one more than the previous number in the counting sequence and includes all previous numbers within it. Six includes 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1. It also reinforces number sequencing where the student does not have the crutch of the starting from number 1. These skills are part of the Common Core and mandated for each teacher to teach and for each student to learn.

This counting forward activity comes with the 2 sets of clip cards, a set of “Count to 50” charts, 2 response sheets, 2 answer keys, a game board, zap cards, 3 spinners, storage labels, complete directions, and the handout, 20 Ways to Engage Students by Using Task Cards. The materials are delivered to you in both black and white, as well as color. These cards can be used with student-to-student work, student-to-teacher work, as well as in a self-correcting mode.


Students can practice counting using the clip cards (or task cards) that are included with the set. Each set comes with 2 group of cards: numbers 1-27 and numbers 24-50. But this activity is about more than math. Use of the cards can enhance fine motor control if played this way: each child has to mark the correct card with a clothespin or other marker. Simple and fun solutions to irksome problems! A teacher’s use of differentiation is the hallmark of a seasoned educator. This set also addresses the need for differentiation in the classroom. Easier cards are marked with a perky pumpkin and the more difficult cards are identified with a lacy leaf. All of the monsters wear a happy smile and appear friendly and ready to assist your students in their quest to learn math fun.  Each student can see and use the ‘same’ cards with the ‘same’ pictures on them. So there is no stigma attached to one set of students playing one game from another set of students playing a different game. This resource is a handy and Halloween-y tool to keep kids on track to reach the ‘counting to 100’ benchmark. Use it to your advantage and you’ll never be frightened by Common Core Standards again!
0

1st Grade Subtraction Within 20 Firefighter Safety Awareness Resource



Elementary school children struggle learning math. When kids focus on rote memorization of math facts, they don’t develop the ability to think critically, a necessary skill to learning math. But when kids are engaged in solving problems, they are developing the skills to reason, which in turn helps them to figure out how to do math. You can help them to understand the concepts of math by using active lessons involving simple subtraction equations.

What do you want to be when you grow up? A chef, a dancer....a firefighter! We all have memories of being that kid who wanted desperately to ride in the big, red fire engine truck. Firefighters were our heroes and still are. Day in and day out, they come to our aid whenever we call. And every October, National Fire Prevention Week gives educators a chance to remind students about the role these important members of our community play in keeping us safe.

Learning about how to escape safely in the event of a fire emergency is valuable information for living a happy and healthy life, no matter your age. Our youngest among the population can be part of the biggest risks for fire emergencies. Kids are around potential hazards throughout the year: candles burning in the winter, a malfunctioning toaster, a friend playing with matches, lightning strikes during a thunderstorm, dad’s cigarette burning in the ashtray, fireworks in the backyard over the summer, or hot ashes from the wood stove, to name a few. Educating kids about the causes of unsafe situations involving fire can prove to be one of the most important lessons you’ll ever teach your students. And there are ways to build lessons around this necessary information.

Remember, knowledge can save lives. So invite your local fire station firefighters into your classroom to speak. Promote family conversations about fire safety plans with homework associated with firefighters. Your classroom activities can make the firefighter a symbol of safety, knowledge, and confidence. When you incorporate the firefighter into your math lessons for instance, you’re adding to that child’s feelings of safety, knowledge, and confidence around math, by association.

There are plenty of ways to incorporate lessons of fire safety into your existing curriculum. Math is one of them. Perhaps you’re teaching children about immigration, the turn-of-the-century time period, or American history. Discuss the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. It was this October 9th disaster that led to the creation of National Fire Prevention Week every October. In 1911, the Fire Marshals around the country wanted to commemorate this tragic event with greater education about fire safety. At their urging, President Woodrow Wilson, in 1920, issued the first National Fire Prevention Day Proclamation. By 1922, for the Sunday through Saturday in the month of October that passes through October 9th, fire prevention was celebrated and Fire Prevention Week was born.

Do your part to spread the word about fire safety and boost kids’ interest and confidence in doing math with a subtraction within 20 activity for use in 1st grade classrooms or wherever lessons surrounding subtraction within 20 are needed. Numbers are abstract concepts and take time to form in a child’s mind as having intrinsic value. The symbols used in mathematical equations are abstract as well. Their meaning can be elusive to younger elementary kids, especially since they alter when used in different contexts. Is it a dash or a minus sign? But a simple activity involving subtraction and firefighters can help promote greater understanding.

Through Teachers Pay Teachers, you can download Subtracting Within 20 Interactive PowerPoint that allows kids to practice subtraction within 20. This activity has fun sound effects and displays kids dressed as firefighters to help promote discussion about fire safety and fire prevention. It’s even self-correcting. Small change will get you a math lesson activity that can be used over and over again in your quest to teach kids math. Don’t let subtraction within 20 leave the kids in your classroom confused. Build math problem-solving skills and promote fire safety with this activity that can allow you to keep a tally of correct answers. Immediate feedback will have your kids yearning to take part, solve a problem, and hear the applause for their correct answers. Have fun while learning and learn while having fun with these friendly firefighters and their subtraction within 20 math equations.

             Click here to see the resource
0

WHAT CAN I DO ABOUT HALLOWEEN AT SCHOOL?






Cheryl began teaching in 1979 and retired in 2013.  Within that time frame, she taught in four school districts, and in two states.  Early in her teaching career, it was common for schools to host Halloween carnivals during the school day with students attending at different times for different grade levels.  In later years schools changed the name from Halloween carnivals to fall festivals. Many of the fall festivals still had costume contests.  I believe that now it is the choice of the school district or the building principal to decide whether or not Halloween can be celebrated or even mentioned.
Cheryl taught kindergarten at one school were the teachers could books and sing songs as long as witches and ghosts were not mentioned.  At another school nothing pertaining to Halloween could be mentioned at all by the teachers.  Of course the kindergarten students talked to each about their Halloween plans and costumes. 

Whether or not your school allows Halloween celebrations, many parents will send in trinkets or treats. In school that allowed no Halloween mentions at all, Cheryl would put these in plastic bags and have students put them in their backpacks to enjoy at home.  If special snacks were allowed for Halloween, the students would have them at their regular snack time.

There are several fun activities that substitute well for Halloween celebrations.  One of 
Cheryl's favorites was grade level pajama days with a read in.  All of the kindergarten students and teachers would come to school in pajamas.  Students would bring a pillow and a beach towel or small blanket or throw, a simple board game, and  a favorite book or two from home to be shared or read aloud.  The class would have guest readers including the principal, guidance counselor, office staff, and parent volunteers. After that the students would play learning games that went with the pajama day theme. Then it would be time for lunch and recess.  When the students returned from recess, they would have a special snack to eat,  then they would get into small groups to share their books from home.  They would do this on Halloween itself or on the Friday before Halloween,

You could easily adjust the read in activities to many different themes that would substitute for Halloween or be a special day anytime you need one.

  • Superhero Day
  • Pirate Day
  • Bring a Stuffed Animal to School Day
  • Cowboy and Cowgirl Day
  • Folk and Fairy tale Day
If you can talk about friendly Halloween topics at your school or would like a fun Halloween theme game to share with your own children at check out the interactive PowerPoint game on adding doubles and doubles plus one with a friendly, lighthearted Halloween theme.

   
    http://www.inlinkz.com/new/view.php?id=742203" title="click to view in an external page.">An InLinkz Link-up
   

   



5

Painless Problem Solving Daily Routine

by Learning Harbor Resources for Teachers
Grades K - 3

Wouldn't it be great if your students were excited about problem solving every day? Wouldn't it be wonderful if your students thought that problem solving was FUN?  Wouldn't you love to see your students engaged in problem solving?  


This is a classroom tested problem solving routine. We solve two problems a day. On any one day both of the problems are the same type. The types are listed below. First one problem is projected onto a screen and it is acted out by students and worked together as a whole class. The second problem is read and discussed as a whole class and then worked individually or by partners using manipulates, drawing pictures, or using math strategies that the students have learned. It is important for first graders to solve four types of math word problems.

  • Add To, or Join
  • Take From, or Separate
  • Put Together / Take Apart/ or Part, Part, Whole
  • Compare 
The term Compare is used in both Cognitively Guided Instruction  and Common Core Standards. The terms Join, Separate, and Part, Part, Whole are used in Cognitively Guided Instruction. The terms Add To, Take From, and Put Together / Take apart are used in Common Core Standards.

These are my tried and true methods of teaching problem solving. This works well for whole class or for guided math groups.  Below is a list of the activities I use.  After that, is an example using each type of problem.
  • Project a grade level appropriate word problem on a white board or screen.  This should not be a worksheet. Task cards work well because the students will be concentrating on only one problem at a time.
  •  After reading the problem together, I choose students to act out the problem.
  • We reread the problem and students work the problem on wipe off white boards.
I project a new problem of the same type, and we read and discuss the problem as a class.The students solve the problem on a wipe off board or paper.  Students may draw a picture, use manipulatives such as cubes or counters. or us  math strategies that they have learned. 
                                                         Add to, or Join
Kate had 5 flowers.  Julie gave Kate 2 more flowers.  How many flowers did Kate have altogether?
I call two girls two the front of the class. One will play the part of Kate and the other will play the part of Julie. Kate will pick up 5 plastic or paper flowers. Julie will give Kate 2 more flowers. Kate will lay all the flowers on a table and will lead the students in counting the flowers and find the sum of 7. I will project a new Add to, or Join problem.  We will read the problem as a group and discuss it. Students will solve the problem on a wipe off board. Students may draw a picture or use manipulatives such as cubes or counters, or use a math strategy to solve the problem.
Take From, or Separate
Liam had 10 pumpkins.  He gave 2 pumpkins to Jack.  How many pumpkins did Liam have left? 
I will pick two boys to come to the front of the class. One will play the part of Liam and the other will play the part of Jack. Liam will pick up ten small plastic or paper pumpkins and lay them on the table so that the students can see them. Liam will give Jack 2 pumpkins. Liam will lead the students in counting to find the difference of 8. Students may draw a picture or use manipulatives such as cubes or counters to solve the problem.
Put Together/ Take Apart, or Part, Part, Whole
Mrs. Brown had 12 cupcakes.  6 were chocolate and the rest were vanilla. How many were vanilla? 
I would pick one girl to play the part of Mrs. Brown.  She would have 12 plastic or paper cupcakes. She would move 6 away from the group and lead the class in counting how many were left to find a difference of 6. I would then project a new Put Together / Take Apart , Part, Part, Whole problem.  We will read the problem as a group and discuss it. Students will solve the problem on a wipe off board. Students may draw a picture or use manipulatives such as cubes or counters or use a math strategy to solve the problem.  to solve the problem.
                                                              Compare
Matt had 6 balloons.  Kevin had 5 more balloons than Matt.  How many balloons did Matt have?
I will pick two boys to come to the front of the class. One will play the part of Matt and the other will play the part of Kevin. Matt would have six real or paper balloons. Matt would put his balloons on a table. Kevin would add his 5 balloons to the same table.  Kevin would lead the students in counting the balloons to come up with a total of 11 balloons. I would then project a new Compare problem  We will read the problem as a group and discuss it.  Students will solve the problem on a wipe off board. Students may draw a picture or use manipulatives such as cubes or counters or use a math strategy to solve the problem.
                                                               FUN TIP
I make name tags of the names used in the problems for the students acting out the problem.  I make a big deal out of saying something like, "The part of Mrs. Brown, will be played today by Anna" in my best dramatic voice.  The kids LOVE it. Students look forward to this math problem solving time. They LOVE to be chosen to act out the problem.  It is great to have them love problem solving.
                                             BEST RESOURCE SOLUTION
Would you like to try this, but don’t have the time to write out those problems, or identify the type of and sort the problem from materials that you have?   Check out this resource.  It has 20 problems with a fall/ autumn theme. The problems are grouped so that there are always two of each type together.  Just what you need to save time in your already busy schedule.
This resource is available in Google Classroom™ or PowerPoint.


  



Visit and follow us on our Blog for monthly Free Resources. Like and follow our Facebook Page and Instagram. Visit our Pinterest.






5

Hot Off The Press! A Great Way to Practice the Math Addition Strategy, Counting On

by Learning Harbor Resources for Teachers
Grades K-2



Hot Off The Press!  A Great Way to Practice the Math Addition Strategy, Counting On

Some students really struggle with counting on.  They may have trouble starting with the largest number. They may want to count both of the addends. It can be so confusing for young learners.  I was teaching this strategy to a group of first graders. I modeled "touching" my head and said, "Put the larger number in your head and count on the smaller number. We practiced as a group and then the students began working independently. I walked around the room observing and guiding the children.  After about five minutes the students went from "touching" their heads to slapping themselves on the forehead.  Needless to say we moved on to put the larger number in your pocket the next day.

If I were planning to teach this strategy today, in guided math groups, I would pass out laminated pocket shapes, pennies and number cards. I would say, choose two number cards, put the larger number on your card, count on the second number, using the pennies.  I would observe the students and have them tell me the sums.

After the students had had many opportunities to practice with hands on materials.  I would introduce the Addition Strategy Counting On for use with Google Classroom™ activity. One slide from the activity is show above. 

This activity will help students to continue to practice Counting On in a meaningful way.  It takes many repetitions for a strategy to become automatic.  This activity is designed to provide repetitions while keeping the student engaged.  
0

A Way To Help Children in Uganda



By Learning Harbor Resources for Teachers
Grades K - 2



Do you know about Fields of Dreams Uganda? They do wonderful work for orphaned and vulnerable children of Uganda. 

 I have a dear friend who works with this organization.  She has been to Uganda and seen all the great things that are happening.

The Dresses For Dreams 5k is coming up on November 4, 2017.  All proceeds will go towards the Fields Of Dreams Uganda’s Girl Empowerment Projects.  The proceeds will be used to provide washable and reusable feminine hygiene kits for girls at nine partner schools.  More girls will be able to attend school and absenteeism for girls will be reduced. Dresses For Dreams 5K is held in many cities across the US.  What a wonderful project.

I know this will be near and dear to the hearts of all teachers.

If you would like to know more about Fields of Dreams Uganda, check out this link.
0

Color Sorting for use with Google Slides™ and Google Classroom™


by Greg Litton
Pre-K - 2nd Grade


 link from here




Do you want a way to effectively use computer technology with Pre-K and Kindergarten Students? Would you like students to develop computer or device skills while simultaneously developing the sorting skills that are so important to math and science? Here is a free lesson to help you teach technology skills and sorting skills at the same time. Before using this FREE lesson, start with sorting different colored objects such as blocks or counters. After your students have hands on practice with these, you can move on to this Google Classroom™ activity.

There are ten slides in this activity. Each slide asks the students to drag and drop all of one particular color into a marked space on the slide. There is a slide for each of these colors: blue, black, brown, white, green, orange, pink, purple, red and yellow. There are nine movable pieces of the requested color, some with different colored pieces mixed in. Students will sort the colors in the paperless activity and practice dragging and dropping objects on a computer or device.This computer activity can also be used as Response to Intervention or as an authentic assessment.
0

Sorting Shapes with Moveable Pieces for use with Google Classroom™



 link from here


Are you looking for a way to effectively use computer technology with Pre-K and Kindergarten students?  Would you like students to develop computer or device skills while simultaneously developing technology skills?  Here is a freebie to help you do just that! Let’s start with sorting basic shapes. Of course you would introduce basic shapes with attribute blocks and perhaps cut outs of 2d shapes.  After the students have hands on practice with these, you could move on to a Google Classroom™ activity.

There are four slides in this activity.  Each slide asks the students to drag and drop all of one particular shape in a marked space on the slide.  There is a slide for each of the following shapes, circle, square, rectangle and square. There are nine of the requested shape and a few of the other shapes on each slide.  Students sort the shapes in this paperless activity.   

Click on the Link below for the Freebie


0

Just In Time Back to School Sale


 down load from here

Yes, it's back to school time and Learning Harbor for Teachers is having a sale. Visit our store and use code BTS2017 to receive a discount of 25% of all products. Including the products for Google Slides and Google Classroom™. Don't miss out. Sale begins tonight August 1, 2017 at midnight and ends August 2, 2017 at midnight!
0

Sailing into The Future with Digital Activities



Don’t Throw the Teacher Overboard




Digital activities, paperless classrooms, Google Classroom, 1:1 classrooms.  Everywhere teachers are being encouraged to use more digital activities with their students. I think that used properly these devices can be very useful to teachers and students. Teachers should be supported in using digital activities.  Teachers know their students’ needs better than anyone. There are things to remember when planning to use digital activities.
1. There must be a balance.  Students need to write with and without devices. Students need to learn to think, communicate, and use social skills. Students also need to use digital devices.
2. Digital activities help teachers to differentiate instruction. For example, some students may be ready for a math activity in October and others or not ready for the same activity until December.  With a library of digital activities from which to choose, it is easier for teachers to meet the needs of students.
3. Having a variety of activities in different themes allows teachers to assign activities that match their students’ interests.
4. Digital activities help students in intervention groups and special education.
5. Digital activities promote engagement with learning.
6. Digital activities are interactive.
7. Digital activities will work best when teachers have the ability to choose the activities that will best meet the needs of their students.
Learning Harbor Resources for Teachers is proud to share that we are currently working on increasing lines of digital activities including interactive Google Slides, and Google Slides with moveable pieces, for use with Google Classroom as well as interactive PowerPoint games, and Boom Learning Activities.  
Would you like to get a free full sized resource every month?  Just subscribe to our monthly newsletter.
Click the image below for your FREE Interactive PowerPoint Activity


 download from here

0

FREE Interactive Google Classroom Activity

 download to here


Ahoy Friends! Welcome to Learning Harbor Resource for Teachers Preview of the Addition Doubles and Adding to One.  And thanks for visiting Learning Harbor Resources for Teachers.



0

A Little Help setting your goals.



Have you ever thought about selling teaching resources on Teachers Pay Teachers or Teachers Notebook but don’t know where to start? Let’s talk about Business Goals. That's right, a business goal. What is a business goal you may ask? The goal plan is a detailed outline of how you are going to get your business going and making a profit as quickly as possible.  If you were asked to describe a goal, could you do that in less than 10 words? Let me help you. A goal is a dream that is written down. To make it even more to the point, the goal must be SMART. If you were to say your goal is to earn $20,000 in a year selling online digital products, that is a dream and to make it a goal you should write it down and how you are going to achieve that goal. The following is a guide to help you realize your goals. 

I said your goals must be SMART. What that means is that each goal should be:
Specific.   What will the goal accomplish? Why and how will it be accomplished?
Measurable.    How will you measure if your goal has been reached? 
Achievable.     Is it possible? Do I have the necessary knowledge and resource to accomplish the                 goal? Can I meet the goal without defeating myself?
Results.      What is the result of the goal? (Not the activities leading up to the result.)
Time sensitive. What is the established completion date? Does this date create a reasonable 
             sense of urgency?

Using the above goal of earning $20,000 in a year of digital online sales is a fantastic goal. Here is an example of what the SMART goal would look like.

Specific  
By September 1st of 2018 I will have earned $20,000 in sales. These earning will allow me to pay off my mortgage. I will work use social media marketing to achieve these sales.
This is the What, Why and How part. 
Example is "By September 1st of 2018 I will have earned $20,000 in sales" = what
"These earning will allow me to pay off my mortgage" = why
 "I will use social medial marketing strategies to achieve these sales." = how

Measurable
The goal should be measurable so that you have tangible proof of your accomplished goal. The entire goal statement is a measure for the project. In our goal example a monthly measurement can be used to ensure the goal is on track to be met.
This is the measurable part of the goal
Example is “I will have earned $20,000 by September 1st 2018

Achievable
Your goal should be achievable; they should stretch you slightly so you feel challenged and still defined enough so that it can be reached. To achieve your goal, you must have the necessary knowledge and resources to achieve the goal. Most any goal can be met when you plan your steps wisely and establish a time frame that will allow you to carry out those steps. As you go through the plan and carry out the steps you can achieve the goal that may have seemed impossible when you begin.  Note that if a goal is impossible to achieve you may not even want to try. Achievable goals can motivate you. Impossible goals can frustrate and demoralize. 
This is the possible part of the goal. Here you will need the knowledge and skills to achieve the goal.
Example is “I will have earned $20,000 by September 1st 2018”
For you to achieve this goal you should have the basic knowledge of creating digital products and a good working knowledge of social media marketing. You should also have a strong discipline of time management.

Results – focused
Goals should measure outcomes, not activities. The result of our goal is to earn $20,000 by September 1st 2018.  Remember that doing busy work is different than doing productive work. The individual activities and actions that occur in order to make the goal a reality is important but keep in mind that your goal is result focused not a busy work activity focused.  
This is the results part of the goal. 
Example is  “I will have earned $20,000 by September 1st 2018”
This part of the goal results can be seen monthly in your earnings statements.

Time Sensitive
Your goal should be linked to a reasonable time frame that will create a practical sense of urgency or results in tension between the current reality and the completion of your goal. Without the tension or urgency your goal is unlikely to produce the outcome you want.
This is the urgency or when part of the goal.
Example is  “I will have earned $20,000 by September 1st 2018”
The date of September 1st 2018 is the Time Sensitive part of your goal.

The writing of S.M.A.R.T. goals is very important for accomplishing individual goals. Your goal is what you want it to be. There is no reason to compare or measure your goal with someone else’s goal. Remember you only should be better today than you were yesterday.  I hope this helps you with growing and succeeding in your business.
 
Attached is a S.M.A.R.T. Goal Questionnaire. Please use it to help with setting your goals and making those dreams come to profit for yourself.

1

Do you have a goal?





Have you ever thought about selling teaching resources on Teachers Pay Teachers or Teachers Notebook but don’t know where to start? Let’s talk about Business Goals. That's right, a business goal. What is a business goal you may ask? The goal plan is a detailed outline of how you are going to get your business going and making a profit as quickly as possible.  If you were asked to describe a goal, could you do that in less than 10 words? Let me help you. A goal is a dream that is written down. To make it even more to the point, the goal must be SMART. If you were to say your goal is to earn $20,000 in a year selling online digital products, that is a dream and to make it a goal you should write it down and how you are going to achieve that goal. The following is a guide to help you realize your goals. 

I said your goals must be SMART. What that means is that each goal should be:
Specific.            What will the goal accomplish? Why and how will it be accomplished?
Measurable.       How will you measure if your goal has been reached? 
Achievable.        Is it possible? Do I have the necessary knowledge and resource to accomplish
               the goal? Can I meet the goal without defeating myself?
Results.              What is the result of the goal? (Not the activities leading up to the result.)
Time sensitive.   What is the established completion date? Does this date create a reasonable
                            sense of urgency?


The writing of S.M.A.R.T. goals is very important for accomplishing individual goals. Your goal is what you want it to be. There is no reason to compare or measure your goal with someone else’s goal. Remember you only should be better today than you were yesterday.  I hope this helps you with growing and succeeding in your business. 

0

Summer!




"Summertime and the living is easy."  I love those lyrics from the song, "Summertime," by George Gershwin.  The living can be easier for teachers during summer break.  However it is important to remember that summer is not one long paid holiday.  Teachers who get checks during the summer have already earning that money during the previous school year.  

Many teachers take part time jobs during the summer to earn extra money.  Some teachers work in retail.  Cheryl enjoyed working at a Disney Store when we lived in TX.  For her, the perks were fantastic.  As a life long Disney fan, she loved earning discounts on tickets to Disney parks and at Disney resort hotels.

Many teachers work at clothing stores to earn discounts on fashion for themselves or their children, or at gyms to help pay for memberships for their families.  One of Cheryl's teacher friends worked at a movie theater because she loved earning a little extra money and being able to see the summer blockbusters.  If you would like to work during the summer, try to find something you truly enjoy.

 Many teachers like to devote extra time and attention to their families during the summer. This does not have to be expensive.  Look for local attractions that offer discounts for teachers.  Zoos and museums often offer educator discounts.  Sea World is known for offering teacher discounts.
Discount movies are a great place to spend a couple of hours on a rainy afternoon.

Do the things that you loved as a kid with your kids.  Play putt putt.  Go to a water park.  Go to a local beach. Go on a picnic.  Read good books together.  See an outdoor play.  Attend an outdoor concert,

Most importantly of all take time to enjoy some unstructured time.  Decompress and relax.  Recharge your batteries so you can go back to the new school year with renewed energy.  Don't forget to treat your self to a massage or a manicure.  Do the things that make you feel special.

Have a great summer!

What is your favorite summertime fun?
0

June FREEBIE Classroom Resource



OH Yes We Did!  It was the first boo boo of the summer. Did you notice, when you received your newsletter a little something not right? We did and just to make everything better we are sending you a FREE classroom resource. 
In the future, we will try not to make those boo boo's but know that if we do, you win with another  bonus free classroom resource. Click the link below to get your resource.

0

Six Positive Classroom Management Strategies







“Students don’t care how much you know, until they know
 how much you care!”  John C. Maxwell.

Take time to get to know your students.  Give each student the opportunity to talk, write, or draw about themselves each day for the first two weeks of school.    Do they participate in a sport?  Do they have a pet or pets?  What do they love to do when they have free time?  What do they like to do with friends?  Would they rather spend time working alone or with a friend?  Who are the members of their families?  Keep these drawings, writings, and notes that you take when a child is sharing orally in a file for each child.  These will be valuable when you need to give a student assignments that fit his or her interests.

Grab the students’ attention before transitions.  I would often break into song.  The songs were usually made up on the spur of the moment, but some were favorites that I used year after year.  During the crazy holiday season, I would sing, “Deck the halls with boughs of holly.”  The children would sing, “Fa, la, la, la, la.”  Then we would all but our fingers over our lips and say “shhhh”, very quietly. This was very calming to the students and to me.  Clapping hands, turning off the lights, playing a chime, are just a few of the strategies for getting the students’ attention.

Establish routines, and model, model, model!  Once in the middle of the school year, a new student joined our class.  He did not speak or understand English.  This is when I learned the awesome power of modeling behavior expectations.  I would pull out a card with a situation such as walk quietly to the carpet.  I would demonstrate an incorrect way to follow the direction, and then call on two or three students to act out the correct way.  The whole class loved this.  Anytime the class needed some reminders of routines or expectations, we would act out the incorrect and correct way to follow the directions on our behavior choice cards.

Correct students privately.  No one likes to be criticized in front of his or her friends.  If it is a small correction, quietly whisper to the child.  If a serious talk is needed ask the child to meet you at the door, step out into the hall and talk quietly with the child.  Remember to keep the door open, so you can hear what is going on in the class, and stay very close to door.  Don’t scold, use a quiet voice and discuss the situation. 

Keep your composure.  School can be overwhelming for both students and teachers.  If you feel stress building, take a deep breath and center yourself.

Let your students know that you love them.  Establish routines and remind students of the routines whenever needed.  Model the routines.  Remind students of classroom expectations in supportive ways.  Be firm and kind.  Sometimes your tone of voice can make all the difference.  

What are your favorite tips for classroom management?  We would love to read your comments.


0

Our Newest Self Correcting Interactive PowerPoint Activity




Which Fact Does NOT Belong?

Do you struggle with adding rigor to math activities?  Are you limited in making copies?   Do you want an interactive, self correcting game that requires no copying of the game in expensive color ink, no cutting, and no laminating?  Do you want to easily differentiate instruction without using or using fewer worksheets?
This activity can be used with PowerPoint 2010 and newer.  It may be just what you are looking for.

Students love the self correcting feature of this game. When a student clicks on, or touches a correct answer he hears applause and sees a slide that says "Way to Go!".   If a student clicks on or touches an incorrect answer he hears a breaking glass sound and sees a slide with "Oops Better Luck Next Time!".

Once your students have had practice with constructing fact families, take the instruction one step further and have the students find the fact that does not belong.  Learning fact families is often challenging for students.  With this interactive, self correcting PowerPoint Slide Show game, Fact Families Which Fact Does Not Belong, you can easily differentiate instruction for students who have a strong understanding of fact families.

The apple theme is perfect for fall, but this activity could be used any time of year.  There is No Prep needed for this game.  Just download onto your computers and play.  There is a response sheet and an answer key provided. If you choose to use those you will make one copy of the answer sheet, and a class set of  response sheets. There is no copying of the game in expensive color ink, no cutting, and no laminating!  




0

Glorious Spring.. Allergies Everywhere!! What can help.


Achoo!!  Gesundheit!



March 20 was the first day of spring this year. And for many it was the first day of allergy season. Oh yes, the sun crosses the equator, day and night are the same length. Achoo!!
It is the beginning of 2017 allergy season. For years I lived in the Texas Hill County where there are some of the most beautiful natural sights to be seen anywhere. There are trees of every size and shape, and flowers of every color, and there is pollen. There are lots and lots of cedar trees in that part of the country. Every day the news would put up the Daily Pollen Count and at the top is cedar and soon to follow oak. The weather guesser would tell how hot it would be and then tell how many parts per cubic meter of pollen could be found in the air. The allergy became known as Cedar Fever. It is the worst of the worst for allergy sufferers. Many new comers to the area would chuckle and say there is no such thing. Oh, but give it a year and you too would enjoy the Cedar Fever.

What to do??? As for helping yourself, some basic advice is to use a HEPA air purifier. You may need more than one. Try to keep the humidity in your home constant. Once you come indoors change your clothes, the pollen is in the fabric of your clothes and will come in with you. Wash your face and hands. Use a damp cloth and run it over your hair to help remove the pollen. 

In the classroom always wash your hands and face. Use a damp paper towel to wipe your face and pat dry with a clean paper towel. 

See your doctor. The doctor may be able to write a prescription to bring a little relief. In the mean time keep a box of tissues near by. Go outside and enjoy the sights, sounds, and beautiful days of spring. AAAACHOOoooo!  
0

Subtraction Within 20 Interactive Digital Activity



Do you need a fun and engaging way for your students to practice subtraction within 20? This self correcting, interactive PowerPoint slide show with sound effects might be just what you need.


Students will click on a random symbol on the home page and be taken to a subtraction problem. Students work the problem, record their answer, and check their work by clicking the picture next to their answer choice on the slide. If the student clicks on a correct answer, a slide with “Way to Go!” will pop up and the student will hear applause. If the student clicks on an incorrect answer a slide with “Oops Better Luck Next Time” will pop up and the student will hear a breaking glass sound effect.
0

REFLEX - WHAT??

Reflexology has been around for thousands of years. The idea is that there are small and specific areas of innervation in the feet that correspond to specific muscle groups or organs. Through the application of pressure or massage on specific areas, reflexology is said to promote relaxation, improve circulation and help support the normalization of the related area in the body.
Reflexology it is intended to reduce stress and help the body reals and help with optimal balance of the body’s biochemical and other systems.  Having the feet rubbed is an enjoyable and relaxing experience for most people, there is little doubt that reflexology can help reduce stress and promote a sense of wellbeing much the same as any other form of massage.
Most reflexology session run from thirty to sixty minutes. Shoes and sock are removed and the client is made comfortable. Some reflexologists offer a foot bath at the beginning. Pressure is applied using the thumb and finger in a rolling or walking pattern. This give a gentle stretching and massaging of specific zones.
Chinese Reflexology Massage is considered acupressure, sharing the same principles as acupuncture but utilizing them without the needles. Reflexology massage is believed to have been practiced as far back as 2450 B. C. in China and Egypt.

Does it work?  I don’t know. But I like it.


0

Some Answers to the WHY Question


WHY?
Why are many coin collection jar banks shaped like pigs?
BECAUSE
Long ago, dishes and cookware in Europe were made of dense orange clay called 'pygg'. When people saved coins in jars made of this clay, the jars became known as 'pygg banks.' When an English potter misunderstood the word, he made a container that resembled a pig. And it caught on.


WHY?
Why is someone who is feeling great 'on cloud nine'?
BECAUSE
Types of clouds are numbered according to the altitudes they attain, with nine being the highest cloud. If someone is said to be on cloud nine, that person is floating well above worldly cares.

WHY?
Why are people in the public eye said to be 'in the limelight'?
BECAUSE
Invented in 1825, limelight was used in lighthouses and theaters by burning a cylinder of lime which produced a brilliant light. In the theater, a performer 'in the limelight' was the Center of attention.

WHY?
Why is shifting responsibility to someone else called passing the buck'?
BECAUSE
In card games, it was once customary to pass an item, called a buck, from player to player to indicate whose turn it was to deal. If a player did not wish to assume the responsibility of dealing, he would             "pass the buck" to the next player. 

WHY?
Why do X's at the end of a letter signify kisses?
BECAUSE
In the Middle Ages, when many people were unable to read or write, documents were often signed using an X. Kissing the X represented an oath to fulfill obligations specified in the document. The X and the kiss eventually became synonymous.


WHY
Why do men's clothes have buttons on the right while women's clothes have buttons on the left?

BECAUSE
When buttons were invented, they were very expensive and worn primarily by the rich. Since most people are right-handed, it is easier to push buttons on the right through holes on the left. Because wealthy women were dressed by maids, dressmakers put the buttons on the maid's right! And that's where women's buttons have remained since.
And now you know.
0
Back to Top